The Knork or “Nelson Fork” by Horatio Nelson

The Knork or "Nelson Fork" by Horatio Nelson
Image: World War I era knork / Science Museum London

Knife, fork and spoon. That’s the three basic categories of cutlery. But you can crossbreed and mix and match, as seen here:

Today we are going to talk about the “Knork” which is the love child of the Fork and Knife. In short, you get a fork that you can use to cut your food before stabbing it and getting it into your gob. Now look at the photo of that old time knork up top. That’s a scary looking rusty blade attached that’s just looking to slice open the corner of your mouth isn’t it? I’m not going there.

But if you only had one arm like Horatio Nelson then this might be your only option. Horatio Nelson was a British naval admiral who went to war with Napoleon in 1798. And it cost him his ark which was amputated aboard a ship. So for his arm and efforts the British Army gave him a golden Knork which was thereon referred to as “Nelson’s Fork”.

The modern day Knork is a lot more practical. Back in 2015 Oprah Winfrey even a knork set on her list of favorites.

And that was a historical cutlery lesson for you.

Share

The Notation Knife – Musical Cutlery

The Notation Knife - Musical Cutlery

A little bit of musical cutlery history today. This is flatware that really sings.

These very rare knives are known as notation knives. They are inscribed with a thank you for the meal prayer: ‘The blessing of the table. May the three-in-one bless that which we are about to eat.’ On the other side the inscription reads: ‘The saying of grace. We give thanks to you God for your generosity.’

These 16th-century knives are in museum collections around the world, including examples at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London and the Musée national de la Renaissance at Château d’Ecouen in France.

Each knife represents one part for a singer. A set of knives creates a complete symphony chorus of voices.

Reproductions can be found here: http://myarmoury.com/chad_dagg_dav_notationknife.html

Read more information and hear the music being performed here:
https://mymodernmet.com/renaissance-notation-knives/

Share

The Heretic’s Fork – Cutlery Gone Wrong

heretics fork

Sometimes we push the limits of the definition of “cutlery” here at The Cutlery Review. We don’t post about knives much because they are a world unto themselves. It’s like the world of wine but we don’t like red, you get it? So cutlery sometimes includes kitchen gadgets, sometimes it’s things that hold cutlery. It’s our blog and we blog about what we want and most of the time it’s cutlery, flatware, utensils, tableware, silverware or whatever it’s called at home. Whether it’s a fork, spoon, knife, spork or knork we’ll cover it.

But we acknowledge that this time we are pushing it a little. I mean, it is a fork. Just look at the picture above. It’s a nice shiny chrome fork. But how it’s used is rather medieval, actually it’s actually medieval. How it is used puts the “evil” in medieval. You looked ahead to the next picture didn’t you? Cheater.

heretics fork

So ya, that’s how it’s to be used.

Here’s the definition:

“A medieval torture device which consisted of a two-sided fork which would be strapped to the victims neck so that any movement of the jaw caused extreme pain.”

Nice huh? Not something we would want to wear. Oh, you do? OK, we don’t judge. What ever you do with your cutlery at home is your business.

Here’s a link to buy a nice fancy one (ADULTS ONLY):

Leather and Stainless Steel Heretics Fork from Amazon

Share

The Gray Kunz Spoon

Gray Kunz Spoon

We aren’t sure how this legend of cutlery escaped us all this time. A single piece of cutlery so infamous that it carries it’s inventor’s name. This is the Gray Kunz Spoon.

First of it’s pronounced “koons”. Gray Kunz, a successful New York chef who worked at Lespinasse, was being driven crazy by crappy flatware. He needed a spoon for cooking food or just platting dishes and what he had didn’t work. So he created his namesake tool to do just that. With a deep bowl, tapered edge, holding 2.5 tablespoons; a short handle, easy to control and perfectly balanced. This was the spoon he and every chef needed to created their dishes quickly and efficiently.

He had them manufactured in the late 90’s and soon every chef had one or wanted one.

Sadly, Gray Kunz passed away in March 2020. But his legend lives on.

J.B. Prince U715 S/S Chef Gray Kunz Sauce Spoon from Amazon

JB Prince Gray Kunz Spoon – Special Edition
Damascus Pattern from Amazon

Share